Gaaden

After three years as vice-rector of the Leopoldinum Seminary, and a year as rector in Siegenfeld, my Lord Abbot has decided to propose me as parish priest in Gaaden. Cardinal Schönborn, following the Lord Abbot’s proposal, has appointed me to begin in Gaaden at the beginning of September. I will be leaving the Leopoldinum and Siegenfeld, but will still be lecturing in moral theology at the theological college (Hochschule) in Heiligenkreuz.

Gaaden has about 1,600 souls, and is about 5 kilometers from Heiligenkreuz, to which it has belonged since 1376. The beautiful parish Church is dedicated to St. James as patron of pilgrims, as it is on one of the traditional pilgrimage routes from Vienna to Mariazell. It has baroque altars. There is a parish hall called “Haus Sankt Jakob,” which was once a school. And next to the House St. Jakob is a very nice rectory, which is already making me feel like Mr. Collins in Pride and Prejudice. The parish also has chapels-of-ease in Untergaaden and Sparbach.

Please say a prayer for me, reader, as I prepare to take up my new duties.

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The Lamp

The brilliant Matthew Walther of The Week and William Borman of Incudi Reddere are starting a Catholic magazine that promises to be all that a Catholic magazine should be. As their fundraising page puts it:

The Lamp will be a magazine in the old-fashioned sense, witty, urbane, not pompous or shrill, full of serious reporting, insightful opinions, squibs, oblique parodies, bagatelles, and arts coverage that draws attention to those things that are true, good, and beautiful whether they belong formally to the Church or not, not a throwaway click-driven venture in chasing worthless trends or drumming up outrage… At The Lamp we will take marching orders from neither the discredited ideologies of the progressive left or the libertarian-conservative right nor from the neoliberal consensus of atomization, spoliation, rootlessness, and mindless entertainment into which both are rapidly being subsumed, but rather from the immutable teaching of the Church. We are not nostalgists harkening after a mythical “moment before” when it was supposedly possible to reconcile the Church to the world.

I think it is going to be wonderful.

The Roof of the Abbey Church in Heiligenkreuz

The burning of the roof of the cathedral in Paris made me want to go up and explore the inside of the roof of my abbey Church again. I hadn’t been up there in years. Like Notre Dame, our Abbey too has the original medieval wooden roof construction intact. It also has a small spire over the sanctuary, and a large tower next to the church. I went into both of them today.

Here is a video of today’s trip:

And here is a tour that I gave a guest some years ago:

Easter Monday

In Germany and Austria Easter Monday is a holiday, and the Emmaus Gospel is still read, even in the ordinary form. (The German versions of the Missal and Lectionary of Paul VI preserve a number of features of the older form that were abandoned in the typical editions— including dates of popular feasts, ember days, and, as in this case, the Gospels for some particular days). It is therefore customary to take a walk on Easter Monday. I took one with some of my confrères and some guests.

Sancrucensis in the U.S.

I will be traveling to the U.S. soon to give three lectures. I cordially invite any American Sancrucensis readers to attend.

Bona Matrimonii: A Moral Theologian’s Valentine

Red is the rose, green is the tree.
The married state of goods has three.

Roses are red, violets are blue.
Of goods the first is to be true.
The man who dares betray his wife,
Will have no share of Heaven’s life.

Roses are good, so are children,
Twelve, fourteen, or: a million.
Contraceptors this good deny,
In hellish flame those sinners fry.

Roses are red (it’s by design),
Of goods the third: a sacred sign.
A sacrament of Christ’s good love
Like the dewfall from … above.

Roses are red, I won’t conceal
The religious life is more real.
But better now (that’s the concern)
To get married than hot to burn.

The Dawn of a New Day

The whole race of God’s enemies was destroyed in the manner indicated, and was thus suddenly swept from the sight of men. So that again a divine utterance had its fulfillment: I have seen the impious highly exalted and raising himself like the cedars of Lebanon and I have passed by, and behold, he was not and I have sought his place, and it could not be found.

And finally a bright and splendid day, overshadowed by no cloud, illuminated with beams of heavenly light the churches of Christ throughout the entire world. And not even those without our communion were prevented from sharing in the same blessings, or at least from coming under their influence and enjoying a part of the benefits bestowed upon us by God. All men, then, were freed from the oppression of the tyrants, and being released from the former ills, one in one way and another in another acknowledged the defender of the pious to be the only true God. And we especially who placed our hopes in the Christ of God had unspeakable gladness, and a certain inspired joy bloomed for all of us, when we saw every place which shortly before had been desolated by the impieties of the tyrants reviving as if from a long and death-fraught pestilence, and temples again rising from their foundations to an immense height, and receiving a splendor far greater than that of the old ones which had been destroyed. […]

After this was seen the sight which had been desired and prayed for by us all; feasts of dedication in the cities and consecrations of the newly built houses of prayer took place, bishops assembled, foreigners came together from abroad, mutual love was exhibited between people and people, the members of Christ’s body were united in complete harmony. […]

And there was one energy of the Divine Spirit pervading all the members, and one soul in all, and the same eagerness of faith, and one hymn from all in praise of the Deity. Yea, and perfect services were conducted by the prelates, the sacred rites being solemnized, and the majestic institutions of the Church observed, here with the singing of psalms and with the reading of the words committed to us by God, and there with the performance of divine and mystic services; and the mysterious symbols of the Saviour’s passion were dispensed.

At the same time people of every age, both male and female, with all the power of the mind gave honor unto God, the author of their benefits, in prayers and thanksgiving, with a joyful mind and soul. And every one of the bishops present, each to the best of his ability, delivered panegyric orations, adding luster to the assembly.

Eusebius, Church History, X.